French Artist Creates New Rendition Of Historic Train Station


French Artist Creates New Rendition Of Historic Train Station

A French artist has envisioned a revamping of a train station that transforms the transportation depot into a library which contains a beautiful tropical garden, complete with blue skies, grass and bushy palm trees.

French artist and interior designer Pierre Ciret constructed the conceptual rendition of the hypothetical library from a historic train station called Gare de Nice-Ville, which is located on Avenue Thiers in the French city of Nice. The name is appropriate, because the rendition can certainly be called “nice”.

The artist describes the atmosphere of the design as consistent with what is already present. He says that it would be fun, playful and full of vibrant life. Sunshine would stream in to brighten the building’s attractive atmosphere.

The station’s current construction would be kept in place, and it would be used to complement the presence of new colors and materials, allowing people to enjoy the modern-meets-nature design and make the most out of available space.

Large openings would bring solutions to the problems of glare, heat and poor lighting. Visitors would be able to read in great comfort.

The design also includes curved glass ceilings, rustic hardwood floors and courtyards consisting of grass and palm trees, centering a bodacious boardwalk.

And of course, a library would not be complete without bookshelves. In Ciret’s design, bookshelves would blend into the scenery, almost as if they were a part of nature. The natural beauty of plants and sun rays would shine in the open space.

Although it’s just an artist’s rendition, it’s fun to imagine that such a gorgeous area actually exists. Ciret definitely did a “nice” job.

Gare de Nice-Ville was built in 1867. It was originally built away from the town center of Nice, but the city has since expanded, making the station one of the city’s center points. While the station has been remodeled several times, it has kept its traditional style of Arles stone sculptures and a forged steel rooftop.

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