Historians Believe They’ve Discovered King Henry V 600 Year Old Sunken Ship


Historians Believe They’ve Discovered King Henry V 600 Year Old Sunken Ship

A sunken warship that assisted Henry V in a war against France is believed to have been located in the Hampshire River of England. The remains of the vessel are almost 600 years old.

The ship is known as the “Holigost”, and it was one of the four “great ships” that were commissioned by King Henry V in England’s war against the French.

It was identified in an aerial photograph that was taken by historian Dr. Ian Friel. The historian identified the wreckage while he was researching evidence to be used in an upcoming historical book about the navy of Henry V.

The Holigost participated in naval combat during the Hundred Years War. It was unique for the fact that it was once repaired underwater by a diver in 1423, which is believed to be the first recorded example of an English diver repairing a ship.

Researchers plan on conducting future scientific exploration of the ship, including sonar and aerial imaging by using drones equipped with cameras. The researchers hope to learn more about warships in the 15th century, and they aspire to obtain a better understanding of what naval warfare was like at the time.

The Holigost was found nearby another warship, the Grace Dieu, which was said to be the primary vessel of Henry V. The Grace Dieu was found in the 1930s.

Chief executive of Historic England Duncan Wilson is extremely excited by the discovery.

He said, “It holds the possibility of fascinating revelations in the months and years to come.”

Dr. Friel added, “In my opinion, further research leading to the rediscovery of the Holigost would be even more important than the identification of the Grace Dieu in the 1930s. The Holigost fought in two of the most significant naval battles of the Hundred Years War, battles that opened the way for the English conquest of northern France."

For now, historians will continue to explore the warship to learn more about England’s naval past.

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