Why Are Fewer Americans 'Very Proud' Of Their Nation?

Why Are Fewer Americans 'Very Proud' Of Their Nation?

The latest World Values Survey, which shows the impact of people's changing wants and needs in life, has some troubling news for America.

Only 56% of Americans said they were "very proud" of their nation, which is down from over 62% in 2009 (71.1% in 2004, and 77% in 1999). That means America now ranks only 30th in the world for national pride.

We have now fallen behind nations such as Libya, Nigeria, Egypt, and Poland.

Perhaps its time to reflect more on yesterday's Princeton study showing that congress, literally, doesn't care what we think.

Here's what the survey does and what its all about:

"The World Values Survey (WVS) is a worldwide network of social scientists studying changing values and their impact on social and political life. The WVS has carried out representative national surveys in 97 societies containing almost 90 percent of the world’s population. These surveys show pervasive changes in what people want out of life and what they believe. In order to monitor these changes, the WVS has executed five waves of surveys, from 1981 to 2007. Representative national samples of each society’s public are interviewed, using a standardized questionnaire that measures changing values concerning religion, gender roles, work motivations, democracy, good governance, social capital, political participation, tolerance of other groups, environ-mental protection and subjective well-being. The countries included in these surveys cover the full range from very poor countries to very rich ones, from authoritarian systems to liberal democracies and covering all major cultural zones. These surveys provide valuable information about a crucial component of social change: the values, beliefs and motivations of ordinary citizens. This new source of evidence has dem- onstrated that people’s beliefs play a key role in economic development, the emer- gence and flourishing of democratic institutions, the rise of gender equality, and the extent to which societies have effective government."


Courtesy of World Values Society / ZeroHedge

The full survey can be seen at worldvaluessurvey.org

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