When sitting through a long flight, it is natural tendency to get bored and check out all possible surroundings ad nauseum. We stare at the back of the seat in front of us, the people all around us and even read the little magazine situated next to the safety instructions. It is simply amazing what Skymall thinks we will purchase from that catalog.

Another thing flyers do is look out and at the window, even though for most of the flight there is nothing to see but darkness or the clouds. And, while looking out the window, we notice that there is that tiny little hole at the bottom of the window. We often look at it without a second thought, but it is intriguing. Why is that tiny hole there? What is its purpose?

Well, that tiny hole actually serves a very important purpose. It is a safety feature that is found on every single window of the airplane. It is called a breather hole and serves to regulate the pressure amount that flows between the window’s outer and inner panes. Basically, the design of the window, including that little hole, ensures that the outer pane bears the brunt of the majority of air pressure – so if ever there was added strain on the window, the outer panel panel gives way. And in turn, we can still breathe. A very important necessity.

Another feature of the tiny hole: it keeps the window free of fog and condensation by sucking out moisture that gets stuck between the inner and outer window panes. So, mystery solved!

Bon Voyage and happy flying!

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